Tag Archives: book-to-movie

Book Blogger Hop: Book-to-Movie

27 May

Book Blogger Hop

 

“What book-to-movie adaption have you most liked?
Which have you disliked?”

I almost didn’t answer this week’s question because it’s so much like the list I just made.  Then I realized that this was an  opportunity to expand on my list.  Since posting, I’ve had a number of conversations that pointed out some possibly overlooked movies.  This way, I can add them 🙂

Gone with the Wind is a movie that I absolutely adore!  The book, however, was a tough one.  I hated it.  I think that Scarlett is endearing in the movie, but was horrible in the book.  I’m so glad they made that movie!

So that falls under most liked (movie) and disliked (book).

I promise, I’ll put this topic to rest for a while!

Five Best Books Made into a Movie

25 May
Click to learn more

Click to Learn More

I’m very excited to participate in this meme created by Cassandra at Indie Reader Houston.  Each week, there is a new topic, and I’ll be making a Top Five list.  This week’s list: Five Best Books Made into a Movie

1) Bridget Jones’s Diary, by Helen Fielding I wanted to start things out with a movie that I absolutely loved!  I actually wasn’t a huge fan of the book; it seemed a little strange to me.  Of course, I read the book after falling in love with the movie and I know that makes a big difference.  Still, great for the Top Five.  A decent book and an awesome movie!

2) Bridge to Terabithia, by Katherine Paterson My first ever favorite book, I’ve read this more times than I can count.  The movie was cute, but misses the point completely.  Paterson is so good at describing the way the characters feel, and creating world that feels magical amidst a child’s lonely background.  It’s on the list because of the book, not because of the movie.

3) The Green Mile, by Stephen King I have to include Steve King on my list.  I’m a huge fan of all of his writing, and he has a ton of movies out!  To stay true to the list, I chose one that was based on his book (versus a novella) and was excellent in its own right. 

4)The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins Yes, this isn’t actually a movie yet.  Still, I’m looking forward to this movie and have been following the casting since it was announced.  The things that make the books so great can’t be translated to the big screen, but I’m hoping to see my favorite characters and the vivid settings illustrated beautifully!

5) The Princess Bride, by William Goldman  Who doesn’t love this cult classic movie?  And this is a book that is just as lovable for different reasons.  I feel like this is a great ending to the top five because the book and the movie share the spotlight together so well! 

Honorable Mentions
I would like to make a shoutout to two books that don’t qualify for this list.

  • The Dark Tower Series, by Stephen King I’ve been closely following the proposed movie/series adaptation of these books.  I love this series, and would love to see it in a movie (if done correctly).  However,I have my doubts that it will actually happen, especially with news like this
  • Why won’t anyone make a movie about The Amber Chronicles, by Roger Zelzany?  I fell in love with this world when I was in college, and there is so much potential for making a movie.  There isn’t even a Sci Fi mini series.  I wish someone would make this happen!

The Passage, By Justin Cronin

22 Oct

“You should have seen it.  The way they swoop down from the trees.  We really should have seen that coming.”

Recently, a facebook advertisement was kind enough to inform me that while Justin Cronin was on Good Morning America talking about his book The Passage, Stephen King called in to congratulate him on such a great book. Being the dedicated King fan that I am, I had to check it out.

The Passage is written in several parts, following several hundred of years of Post-Apocalyptic history. It begins with several story lines that all come together at a government research facility studying the effects of a virus that seems to give eternal life, give or take a few nasty side effects. As these things often do, the “experiments” get out of hand and seven scary creatures escape into the world. This marks the creation of a new world where light is the key to survival and very few actually make it.

Fast forward a hundred years later and the remaining survivors have created their own society.  The “virals” are held back with constant light.  Things are still dangerous though, and they are about to change once again, thanks to a little girl who has been there since the beginning.

I’m sad to say that I was disappointed. In fact, it took me quite a while to get through this book. The beginning started out slow. Eventually things picked up, and right as I was getting really interested, that part ended. I think I was really put off by the fast forwarding in the middle of the book, into what felt like a completely different novel. It took some getting used to. That being said, I think I can see why King would be really into it. Cronin created a complete world, full of detail and mixed into reality. As a fan of Post-Apocalyptic fiction, I appreciated the explanation of a brand new government structure. There’s also a great scene in Las Vegas that got my imagination stirring.

I only recently learned that this is the beginning of an intended trilogy. Learning that, I still don’t know what to think of the ending. Three out of Five stars, which is disappointing because I was really excited about this novel.

The Time Traveler’s Wife, by Audrey Niffenegger

11 Sep

“It comes out so quietly that I have to ask her to repeat it: “It’s just that I thought maybe you were married to me.”

 

Told through both Clare and Henry’s point of view, this is a “timeless” love story quite literally.  Clare met Henry when she was seven; Henry met Clare when she was an adult.  If that last sentence seems confusing, it’s just a taste.  Henry struggles with what he calls “chrono displacement disorder,” and often finds himself shooting through time.  He reappears, either in the past or in the future, not sure of his location and sporting only his bathing suit.  This, needless to say, makes his relationship with Clare a bit complicated.

But isn’t every relationship complicated?  I think that’s the point here.  While every couple has its share of issues, this issue is supernatural.  That doesn’t change how they deal with it.  Clare and Henry have a very real love, made more real by the trials and tribulations caused by time travel.  Since occasionally Clare gives us her point of view, and occasionally Henry tells us his, we never doubt the love between them.  We do, however, see the secrets they don’t share with each other.

What really impressed me about this novel is its beautiful writing.  I learned that Audrey Niffenegger is an artist.  This shows in her writing; she turns words into paint and lays them gently on the page until the story comes to life.  While I was occasionally confused about where and when each scene began, I was constantly intrigued by this story.  I found it warm, heartfelt, and, pardon the repetition, beautiful.

I’m very excited to read the author’s second book, Her Fearful Symmetry.  Five Stars.

 

PS: I saw the movie, and it just seemed pointless.  I don’t know if I would have felt that way had I not read the book, but regardless, read the book.  Don’t bother with the movie.